Common Core Standards

So You Made an Infographic… Now What?

If you’re new to infographics, or have only used them a few times, you may be wondering what exactly you can do with them once you create them. Creating an infographic is half the battle (as you now know), and you want everyone to see your awesome work, right? Using Easel.ly’s infographic templates is easy, but what you decide to do with your images once you’ve created them is entirely up to you. Nevertheless, here are a few recommendations to make sure you get the most bang for your creative buck.

Share, Share, Share

With Easel.ly, you can download your image straight to your desktop or phone/tablet’s camera roll, and share it across your social media from there. You can also save the infographic to Easel.ly’s “Public Visuals,” and let fellow Easel.ly users see the awesome stuff you’ve created (and maybe even use it themselves). Use the JPEGs, PNGs, or PDF files in promotional materials, for a page in your book, for a classroom lecture, or for a boardroom presentation slide. You can also use these infographics on your personal or business websites, on your blog, or in your emails. Whichever way you choose, your information, cause, or business will get a lot of exposure. But how do you know how many people are using, sharing, or viewing your infographic?

Embed and Link

When you create an infographic using Easel.ly, you’ll see the “Share” drop-down menu in the Creation function (when you’re editing and building your infographic). There are choices to share by email, share with link, or embed the code. If you share by email, your contacts will be sent to view the email in Easel.ly’s “Public Visuals” section, and same with sharing the link. Using the Easel.ly space, you can also embed code that will take people directly to your image, and allow them to either use it themselves, or use it as a template for their own infographics.

 

If you have a blog or a website that you’ve created the infographic for, or you want to insert the image into your email or some other form of web-based communication, we strongly suggest that you embed the code. This allows your infographic to appear exactly where you want it to on your page, and has the added bonus of letting people see the infographic in larger detail by linking back to Easel.ly’s site.

Don’t know what embed codes are? Neither do we!

Just kidding! Basically, embed codes are lines of code that you source your image from – the “home base” of the infographic, so to speak. So whenever someone shares your image, that embed code follows the image, and the audience of anyone who shares your infographic can engage with it on Easel.ly when they click it. Embed codes are the little links at the top of images that often come in the form of “Click here to view larger image” or “Easel.ly” in the case of our platform.

But how in the world do you get the embed code?

Step 1: In the Creation window, click “Share” at the top of your toolbar.

image03

Step 2: Drop down to “Embed Code” and click it.image01

Step 3: Click “Copy” to save the code to your computer or mobile clipboard, then hit “Done.”

image02

From there you can insert the code into your blog, website, or email template by inserting the code into your “Text” or “HTML” fields when creating a blog post, web page, or email in your chosen platform. Any time someone copies or shares your image, it will automatically embed the source and send people back to your infographic here on Easel.ly.

 

Bonus tip: Want to know how many people have viewed your infographic? In the same drop-down menu as the “Embed Code” button, there is a “View in Browser” option. Click that, and you’ll be sent to the URL page for your infographic. In the top right hand corner, there is a counter for how many views your image has earned (clearly, we have some sharing to do for the infographic below).

image00

Have questions? Comment here or ask us a question on Twitter or Facebook.

Seeing POV, Simple Strategies for AP World History

Sometimes students and teachers lack the luxury to work on projects for extended periods of time. For example, in my AP World History Course (#WHAP) students must understand 10,000 years of history before the May exam date. In my Modern World Studies course, we have deadlines for research that corollate with guest lectures or collaborations with other classes. Digital tools have made it easier to focus student attention to historic content when I shift classroom management to emphasize:

  1. more class time for experimenting with one or more digital tools.
  2. use of rubrics that credit students for time spent creating. (Creation is not necessarily completion)
  3. investment in online communities that share resources and provide feedback.

Incorporating Easel.ly visual presentation into classroom routines helps me fulfill those goals. I love how easy it is to give students the task of designing a visual to represent a primary source reading and a related topic. They in turn can access a library of shared vhemes. The plethora of expert and amateur models provide direction and a range of ideas for presentation. There is something that appeals to every learning or creative style.

Infographics help express and dispel information at a glance. And they help students emphasize point of view which happens to be a difficult skill when students are attempting to analyze perspectives other than their own.

Meeting CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.11-12.6
Evaluate authors’ differing points of view on the same historical event or issue by assessing the authors’ claims, reasoning, and evidence.

What did this person mean? Who was this written for? What did they look like? are traditional questions for segment primary sources into chunks that students can understand. Chunks accompanied by notes and images are visual interpretations that can be expedited into social platforms or class discussions as they relate to the research topic.

And the visual is not a final product. It is a creation that begs to be shared. Follow up questions, “So, what is missing? What can we add to this? How should we build our research from this one perspective? give students the opportunity to change their text, their images or to combine their presentations into a true curation of collected research.

worldhistory
Let’s take the topic of Mongols in history. Most students have been taught one historic perspective of the bloodthirsty people responsible for delivering a Bubonic Plague and waves of destruction in Eurasia.

If I ask students to quantify the Mongol rise to power by providing access to digital libraries (such as Columbia) I can educate students on the power of perspective and the power of numbers as quantifiers of evidence.

mongol

It is the CCSS expectation for reading stories and literature to push students to routinely refer back to what they’ve read while Easel.ly provides that platform for sorting and framing memory. It works best if students are given a database of primary sources to sort through. For example, using Asia for Educators/ Columbia University site on Mongols combined with Easel.ly database of vhemes for a simple curation meets the needs and desires of differentiated learning. It works well when I push students to present their visual interpretations to small groups, using the “speed dating” model of rotation which can be done in the classroom or later, online with comments on a social platform. Students are curious to view different peer creations yet will search for common ground if the expectation is to draw conclusive evidence from more than one presentation and to finish with a minimal three sentence conclusion that expands their original understanding of Mongols.
I look forward to starting this upcoming school year with simple images, simple messages that unfold into inviting discussions wherever they can take place. A classroom is no longer four simple walls. The possibilities are endless.

This post was written by Whitney Kaulbach who has a wealth of experience being a public school teacher. Check out Whitney’s blog and Twitter

Spotlighting the Reading Information Standard 1

Last week, we took a look at CCSS ELA Reading Literature 1. This week, Easel.ly wants to show you show how easy it is to align your Common Core content with our infographics resources, specifically Reading Information Standard 1. Much like the Reading Information standard, each grade gets more complex, beginning with a Kindergartener’s ability to ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

Kindergarten – 2nd grade teachers:
As a quick review, let’s take a look at the Reading Information Standard 1:

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.K.1 With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.1.1 Ask and answer questions about key details in a text.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.2.1 Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text.

Nonfiction is an important genre to explore with even the youngest of learners. Most teachers have a number of thematic units throughout the year that embeds reading passages with high-interest topics, such as the five senses. Let’s take a closer look at an example which shows how My Five Senses by Aliki can be used to create an attractive review handout that students showcase their understanding of the book, as well as the five senses.

Common Core Standards

 Click here to reuse this infographic

Teachers can create project this vheme onto a smartboard and complete it as part of whole group instruction. Or, if the teacher is looking for an independent assessment, the worksheet can be printed out and copied. Either way, students are engaged in applying Reading Information Standard 1.

Other extension ideas related to this picture book:

  • Create a vheme on Easel.ly that allows students to brainstorm careers where each of the five senses is particularly important.

3rd – 5th grade teachers:
As students transition to the upper primary and intermediate grades, their informational reading skills should include the ability to look back at the text when answering questions. This allows them to see that many times the details provided can aid in answering related questions. At other times, these details can provide “hints” that will allow them to read between the lines and make an inference as to the question’s correct answer. Before looking at an Easel.ly resource that will aid in teaching Reading Information Standard 1, let’s briefly look at the standards for grades 3 – 5:

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.3.1 Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.4.1 Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.5.1 Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text.

A common primary source document that many intermediate age students will explore is The Bill of Rights. Easel.ly can be used to create a post-reading assessment to accompany the Bill of Rights. The vheme can be printed out and copied to allow students to identify which three Amendments they find the most important. On the vheme, they can note note their reasons for picking the Amendment.

Common Core Standards

 Click here to reuse this article

Other extension ideas related to this informational passage include:

  • Encourage students to create a vheme that compares and contrast life in the United States before one of the amendments was passed.

6th – 8th grade teachers:
A key aspect of middle school reading requires that students are able to accurate cite information from a text. Easel-ly is a great resource that will aid students in their goal to properly “cite” information, while adequately supporting their direct quotations. When students are creating posters for display, Easel.ly has endless possibilities to create just the right presentation style to impress teachers with a great layout that includes dynamic visuals and necessary text. Let’s briefly take a look at the Reading Information Standard 1 for grades 6 – 8:

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.6.1 Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.7.1 Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.8.1 Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

While The Declaration of Independence is commonly explored in the middle school social studies curriculum, it is a noteworthy document to discuss in a nonfiction reading unit too. Allowing students to complete inquiry-based learning and analyze the document’s text is a great opportunity to use Easel.ly. Students can create a stunning display that shows their own interpretation of key phrases within the Declaration of Independence.

Common Core Standards

 Click here to reuse this infographic

Completion of a vheme (like the one provided) shows an understanding of key phrases accurately quoted and analyzed from the Declaration of Independence. Clearly, this allows students to increase their ability to cite and reflect on informational writing. Another related idea is:
Assign students to create a vheme on Easel.ly that displays the three branches of government and the functions of each branch.

9th – 12th grade teachers:
Even at the ninth through twelfth grade levels, teachers will find many ways to incorporate Easel-ly into their classroom instruction. A specific vheme may help to clarify the meaning behind a particularly difficult text. Meanwhile, these vhemes can also be used by students to bring dull presentations to life. Let’s briefly look at the standards for grades 9 – 12:

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.9-10.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RI.11-12.1 Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain.

Reading presidential speeches and other primary sources is a vital part of the high school reading curriculum. Let’s take a look at how teachers can use Easel-ly’s resources to create an extended response question for students that explores Abraham Lincoln’s Second Inaugural Address.

Common Core Standards

 Click here to reuse this infographic

Once students have read and discussed the speech with their classmates and teacher, a formative assessment (as shown above) can be completed by students to assess their ability to cite and analyze textual evidence from the speech. In doing so, students can choose two direct quotations to cite and explain in their Easel.ly vheme. This directly correlates with CCSS ELA-RI.11-12.1.

Other extension ideas related to this picture book:

  • Create a vheme on Easel.ly to compare and contrast Abraham Lincoln’s first inaugural address to his second. Another possibility is to have students choose another president, research their inaugural address, and then compare and contrast this selection to Lincoln’s second inaugural address. Regardless of the choice, Easel.ly makes displaying the information easy and in creative form!

To conclude:
Now, that we have looked at some activities which incorporate and assess CCSS ELA Reading Information Standard 1, it’s time to get started using Easel.ly to make your own handouts, projects, and resources. There are virtually limitless possibilities at www.easely.ly. Join us next week for more examples of how Easel.ly is correlating with the CCSS ELA Standards to enrich classroom instruction.

Spotlighting the Reading Literature Standard 1

Beginning this week, Easel.ly wants to show you show how easy it is to align your Common Core content with our infographics resources.  This week our spotlight is on the Reading Literature, CCSS Standard 1.  While the standard does get more complex as the grades increase, beginning in Kindergarten students should be able to ask and answer questions about key details in a text.

Kindergarten – 2nd grade teachers:
As a quick review, let’s take a look at the Reading Literature Standard 1:

  • Kindergarten – With prompting and support, ask and answer questions about key details in a text. – RL.K.1
  • 1st grade – Ask and answer questions about key details in a text. – RL.1.1
  • 2nd grade – Ask and answer such questions as who, what, where, when, why, and how to demonstrate understanding of key details in a text. – RL.2.1

Eric Carle has written a number of phenomenal books that intrigue the minds of youngsters. His clever characters and bright illustrations captivate young minds.  Let’s take a closer look at an example which shows how The Very Hungry Caterpillar, can be paired with Easel.ly to create a fun, interactive formative assessment.

infographic Common Core Standards

Click here to reuse this infographic

Teachers can project this vheme onto a smart board and allow students to complete it. The colored circles can be used to allow students to draw what the caterpillar ate on days 1 through 7. The space under “He ate” can be used to write what he actually ate on each day. After students work together to complete the vheme, you might ask students to answer a question independently in their reading journals, such as: on what day did the caterpillar make a poor choice? What should he have done differently?

Other extension ideas related to this picture book:

  • Create a vheme on Easel.ly to show the life cycle of a butterfly.

3rd – 5th grade teachers:
While the complexity of the Reading Literature Standard 1 is more intricate for the upper primary grades, Easel-ly’s diverse vhemes provide excellent resources to teach, reinforce, and assess this standard. Let’s briefly look at the standards for grades 3 – 5:

  • 3rd grade – Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. RL.3.1.
  • 4th grade – Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. RL.4.1
  • 5th grade – Quote accurately from a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. RL.5.1

Patricia Polacco has written a number of fantastic picture books that provide rich themes and diverse life lessons. Let’s take a look at an example which demonstrates how Thundercake can be paired with Easel-ly to create an interesting post-reading activity.

infographic Common Core Standards

Click here to reuse this infographic

Teachers can project this Easel.ly vheme onto a smart board and allow students to complete it. The turquoise boxes allow students to reflect on two different events from the book that caused the little girl to be frightened. Then, students can reflect on what the little girl’s actual fear. As the teacher displays this interactive on the board, students could be asked to complete it independently in a reading notebook or on a piece of paper. After students complete the vheme, they could write a diary entry from the perspective of the little girl.

Other extension ideas related to this picture book:

  • Create a vheme on Easel.ly to show the required steps to bake a Thundercake.

6th – 8th grade teachers:
If you are looking for a new way to motivate students on short answer and extended answer responses, Easel-ly is the answer! Students can use Easel-ly’s user-friendly interface to create well-organized responses to short answer and extended response reading questions. Let’s briefly look at the standards for grades 6 – 8:

  • 6th grade – Cite textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says as well as inferences drawn from the text. RL.6.1.
  • 7th grade – Cite several pieces of textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says as well as inferences drawn from the text. RL.7.1.
  • 8th grade – Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. RL.8.1.

Reading novels in the middle school classroom is an enriching way to build reading comprehension, inferencing skills, and prepare for national reading assessments. Let’s take a look at how students can use Easel-ly’s resources to answer a short answer and an extended response question:

infographic Common Core Standards

Click here to reuse this infographic

9th – 12th grade teachers:
Even at the ninth through twelfth grade levels, teachers will find many ways to incorporate Easel-ly into their classroom instruction. A specific vheme may help to clarify the meaning behind a particularly difficult text. Meanwhile, these vhemes can also be used by students to bring dull presentations to life. Let’s briefly look at the standards for grades 9 – 12:

  • 9th & 10th grade – Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text. RL.9-10.1
  • 11th & 12th grade – Cite strong and thorough textual evidence to support analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text, including determining where the text leaves matters uncertain. RL.11-12.1.

Classical literature is a vital part of the high school reading curriculum. Let’s take a look at how teachers can use Easel-ly’s resources to create a note taking guide for students. This can help to clarify some of the mystery in the opening scenes of Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare:

infographic Common Core Standards

Click here to reuse this article

Once students have discussed the notes with the teacher, more critical analysis of the direct citations can occur. Students can be asked to choose one or more quotes from the vheme and discuss the meaning of that quote in relationship to that character’s role in Act 1, Scene 1.

Other extension ideas related to this picture book:

  • Create a vheme on Easel.ly to depict five key bits of textual evidence from one character. This textual evidence can be related to a prediction about the text’s plot line.

To conclude:
Now, that we have taken some time to spotlight CCSS Reading Literature 1, I’m sure that your mind is overflowing with ways to incorporate this standard and Easel.ly’s resources into your classroom instruction.

Join us next week for more great examples and a spotlight on CCSS Reading Informational Standard 1.

Infographics + Common Core Standards = Easel.ly

If you are looking for colorful, engaging infographics to teach content related to the “Common Core”, Easel-ly.com is the perfect resource. Now more than ever, teachers are looking for new ways to present content to their students in colorful and engaging formats. Easel.ly is an innovative tool that makes presenting Common Core content clear, concise, and creative.

Easel.ly provides the ability to create and share visual ideas online. Best of all, the visual themes, or vhemes, allow teachers to take an idea, skill, or concept and turn it into a pictorial image. An image could easily compare the protagonist and antagonist in a short story, aligning to the first Reading Literature standard. Or, perhaps, you are looking for a fresh graphic organizer to use for prewriting a friendly letter – Easel-ly is your source. When it comes to finding an infographic that compares two biographies, reviews text structures, or other CCSS, Easel-ly provides the necessary resources.

In seeking to earn the trust of educators, Easel.ly wants to help teachers easily create visual themes that make lessons memorable. Exploring our web site, teachers are greeted by pre-designed templates or the opportunity to “start fresh”. Whether editing our existing templates or creating new vhemes, the web site has a large number of objects, backgrounds, and shapes that make combining visuals with text to create lasting resources, handouts, and activity sheets. Connections between Easel.ly and the Common Core Standards are really as simple as taking the time to explore the web site with a lesson that incorporates one of the Common Core Standards.

Each week, we will spotlight one of the English/ Language Arts Common Core Standards. In fact, starting next week, examples will be provided to show how Easel.ly can assist in teaching the Reading Literature and Reading Informational standards. We are even going to tie in the Writing standards. At least one completed vheme incorporating a classroom activity will be provided to spotlight to “Easel.ly’s Core Content Standard of the Week”. It is our mission to show teachers our dedication to sharing the ease of aligning our infographics with the CCSS.

With Easel-ly, you do not have to worry because we will be providing age-appropriate activities incorporating our infographic vhemes on a weekly basis. Included in these vhemes, at no cost, will be “Easel.ly’s Core Content Standard of the Week” where a Reading Literature or Reading Informational Standard will be presented using classroom-tested resources and extension activities. We will prepare these weekly activities for K-2 classrooms, 3-5 classrooms, 6-8 classrooms, and 9-12 classrooms to match your needs.

Focusing on Common Core Standards, Easel-ly will help you align the CCSS one visual vheme at a time.