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Created with Fabric.js 1.4.5 To Tax or Not to Tax, That is the Question 51.7% 39% Najee Lee 9.2% Sugar-sweetened beverages: Sodas,fruit drinks, and other soft drinks have little nutritional value and are HIGH in calories from sugar.The mean American beverages 50 gallons of sugared beverages annually About the same 30s-40s 40s-50s 60s and older 18% 6% 40% 36% $ Children aged 6 to 11 years increased from 6.5% in 1980 to 19.6% in 2008. Among adolescents aged 12 to 19 years, obesity increased from 5.0% to 18.1% Biggest client mistakes... Failureto have a will Lack of Life Insurance Low High Average Financial advisors say that even the clients that hire them are only of average financial acumen. More than 60% rated their clients financial knowlege as mid-level. A 2012 study published in the medical journal Health Affairs estimated that a penny per ounce tax on sugared beverages could prevent 2.4 million cases of diabetes a year, 8,000 strokes, and 26,000 premature deaths over 10 years. HERES THE SKINNY: Legislation is proposing a 1 cent (penny) per ounce tax on sugar-sweetened beverages. WHY? Soda consumption is associated with increased risk for obesity and type 2 diabetes, especially among children. Among adolescents, soda accounts for about 10% of total calorie intake. The CDC recommends reducing daily sugar-sweetened beverages and increaseconsumption of water and low-fat or fat-free milk. Limited amounts of 100% fruit juices. The mean American beverages 50 gallons of sugared beverages annually The mean American beverages 50 gallons of sugared beverages annually The mean American beverages 50 gallons of sugared beverages annually The mean American beverages 50 gallons of sugared beverages annually The mean American beverages 50 gallons of sugared beverages annually The mean American beverages 50 gallons of sugared beverages annually The mean American beverages 50 gallons of sugared beverages annually The mean American beverages 50 gallons of sugared beverages annually The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services reports that a soda tax could generate $14.9 billion in its first year. The Congressional Budget Officeestimates that a 3-cent-per-ounce tax would generate more than $24 billion over four years. Pro's Con's Decrease obesity epidemic Raise Funds through taxationFund obesity prevention programsSubsidize nutrition programsReduce healthcare costCreate awareness through health campaignsIncrease DEMAND for healthier beverage alternatives No evidence that tax will workHow large a tax will be need to be effectiveMay increase consumption of diet sodasBeverage companies may create "Low Sugar" formulas with questionable chemical profiles Money Talks! The CDC recommends reducing daily sugar-sweetened beverages and increaseconsumption of water and low-fat or fat-free milk. Limit amounts of 100% fruit juices.
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