Infographic Template Galleries

Created with Fabric.js 1.4.5 Huntington's Disease By: Jayme You have Huntington'sDisease when you're born,But it usually occurs aroundyour thirties or forties. The HD gene is affectedin Huntington's Disease.It was mapped tochromosome 4 in 1983and cloned in 1993. There could be a chance togiving Huntington's Diseaseto your baby. It's your decisionto have a baby, even thoughyou might give your babyHuntington's Disease. People are born with the defectivegene, but symptoms usually don'tappear until middle age. Thesymptoms are listed below. -Involuntary jerking or writhingmovements (chorea) -Muscle problems, such as rigidityor muscle contracture (dystonia) -Slow or abnormal eye movements -Impaired gait, posture and balance -Difficulty with the physical production ofspeech or swallowing While more common inadults, juvenile Huntington'saccounts for about one-sixthof all cases. While there iscurrently no cure for Huntingtons, promising research and new ideason lifestyle factors offer new hope. An affected personusually inherits thealtered gene from oneaffected parent. In rarecases, an individual withHuntington disease doesnot have a parent with thedisorder. There is no cure for Huntington disease.There is no known way to stop the diseasefrom getting worse. The goal of treatmentis to slow the symptoms and help the person function for as long as possible. Medicines can be prescribed, depending onthe symptoms. Dopamine blockers may help reduce abnormalbehaviors and movements. Drugs such as amantadine and tetrabenazineare used to try to control extra movements. Depression and suicide are common amongpersons with Huntington's disease. It isimportant for caregivers to monitor forsymptoms and seek medical help for theperson right away. As the disease progresses,the person will need assistance and supervision,and may eventually need 24-hour care. Huntington'sDiseaseusually appearsin a person'sthirties or forties. Also known as HTT Disease An inherited defect in a single gene causesHuntington's Disease. A person needs only one copyof the defective gene to develop Huntington'sDisease. This person has Huntington'sDisease. Works Cited (Information) "Huntington Disease." Genetics Home Reference. N.p., n.d. Web. 28 Jan. "Huntington's Disease." Causes. N.p., n.d. Web. 27 Jan. 2015. National Center for Biotechnology Information (US). Huntington Disease. U.S. National Library of Medicine, n.d. Web. 28 Jan. 2015. "Having Children." Huntington's Disease Youth Organization. N.p., n.d. Web. 30 Jan. 2015. "Huntington Disease: MedlinePlus Medical Encyclopedia." U.S National Library of Medicine. U.S. National Library of Medicine, n.d. Web. 02 Feb. 2015. "Huntington Disease." Genetics Home Reference. N.p., n.d. Web. 03 Feb. 2015. "Huntington Disease." Genetics Home Reference. N.p., n.d. Web. 03 Feb. 2015. "Huntington's Disease: Read About Treatment Options." MedicineNet. N.p., n.d. Web. 04 Feb. 2015. "Huntington's Disease." : Symptoms, Treatment, and Hope. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Feb. 2015. "Huntington's Disease." Prevention. N.p., n.d. Web. 13 Feb. 2015. "Making Babies: Having a Family, the HD Way." RSS. N.p., n.d. Web. 20 Feb. 2015. "Huntington's Disease." : Symptoms, Treatment, and Hope. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Feb. 2015. "Huntington's Disease." Symptoms. N.p., n.d. Web. 11 Feb. 2015. Works Cited (Pictures) Digital image. N.p., n.d. Web. Digital image. N.p., n.d. Web. Digital image. N.p., n.d. Web.
Create Your Free Infographic!