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Created with Fabric.js 1.4.5 Cincinnati Radiation Experiments Dr. Saenger said that the primary purpose of the experiments was to cure the cancer of the subjects, and said that helping the US government was just incidental, however, many speculate that the real purpose of the experiments was to test the amount radiation intake needed to disable a soldier in preparation of the nuclear attacks that might have taken place. Dr. Egilman, who had studied Dr. Saenger's experiment, said that "The study was designed to test the effect of radiation on soldiers. It was known when the study began that whole body radiation wouldn't treat the types of cancer these patients had. What happened here is one of the worst things this Government has ever done to its citizens in secret." One question that has never been answered, is why did the doctor choose human patients instead of animals,when he knew that it could easily get him in trouble. In Cincinnati between 1960 and 1971, during the Cold War, Dr. Saenger, an expert on nuclear medicine and radiology, performed radiation experiments on the poor minorities. Two-thirds of the people were black and, if not, they were poor,and not one of the patients gave their consent. The experiments were done at Cincinnatis General Hospital. Purpose Dr. Saenger, and his colleagues conducted experiments on 88 cancer patients, ages 9 to 84, exposing them to intense doses of radiation and recording their physical and mental responses. The radiation they were exposed to was the highest possible dose, at three hundreds rads, equaling out to 20,000 chest x-rays. Many of the patients were poor, black patients at a public hospital, Cincinnati General, with inoperable breast, lung or gastrointestinal tumors. They were chosen because of their low income, below average intelligence, and their pre-existing cancers. Procedure The experiment helped to contribute to the establishment of radiation safety standards for patients and medical personnel. A former english professor from UC named Dr. Stephens wrote a book that she titled, "The Treatment". She pestered scientists that both took part in these practices and supervised them. Her book outlined those practices of using patients as lab rats for the preparation of the Cold War. Before she wrote the book no one believed her statements on what she saw that was happening with these patients. Her book represented her better than before by proving her statements. The experiment helped to contribute to the establishment of radiation safety standards for patients and medical personnel. A former english professor from UC named Dr. Stephens wrote a book that she titled, "The Treatment". She pestered scientists that both took part in these practices and supervised them. Her book outlined those practices of using patients as lab rats for the preparation of the Cold War. Before she wrote the book no one believed her statements on what she saw that was happening with these patients. Her book represented her better than before by proving her statements. Experimental Results Vertus Hardiman was born March 9, 1922 in Lyles Station, Indiana. When he was only five-years-old, Vertus was used as a lab rat in an extremely dangerous experiment. During the Cold War Vertus and nine other Lyles Station children were given extremely high levels of radiation. The hospital behind this experiment disguised the experiment as a scalpel ringworm treatment. The event left Vertus with a severe physical deformity. He hid his deformity and despite his circumstance, he simply lived his life and chose not to complain. Hole in the Head Man The experiment helped to contribute to the establishment of radiation safety standards for patients and medical personnel. A former english professor from UC named Dr. Stephens wrote a book that she titled, "The Treatment". She pestered scientists that both took part in these practices and supervised them. Her book outlined those practices of using patients as lab rats for the preparation of the Cold War. Before she wrote the book no one believed her statements on what she saw that was happening with these patients. Her book represented her better than before by proving her statements. Positive Outcomes
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